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Minorities with MS May Have Differences in Emotional Health Risk

1/4/2011

Many studies have confirmed that depression is experienced by the majority of people with MS, but a recent study from Mississippi State University suggests that minorities might especially be at risk for developing depressive symptoms associate with the disease.

Of study participants with the neurological condition, 44.2 percent of Latinos and 45.8 percent of African-Americans reported at least mild depression, compared with 38.7 percent of Caucasians with MS. However, more Latinos never received mental health care, compared to whites or African-Americans with MS, according to lead study author Robert Buchanan, Ph.D.
Buchan is a professor in the department of political science and public administration at Mississippi State University. For the study which appeared in the December 2010 issue of the journal Ethnicity & Disease, authors used data from a registry of 26,967 white, 715 Latino and 1,313 African- American people with MS.

“Depression is even more common in people with MS,” said Staley Brod, M.D., director of the Multiple Sclerosis Research Group Clinic at the University of Texas-Houston. “In general it is a treatable problem and, in most cases, the neurologist that’s seeing the patient can deal with it effectively,” he said.

However, compared to African-Americans and Caucasians, Latinos were significantly less likely to get mental health services, obtain medical care from a specialist or receive occupational therapy or home health care assistance.

“A surprising finding to me is that despite these inequities in mental health, rehabilitation and other medical subspecialties, there’s no disparity in treatment,” Brod said. Similar percentages of whites, Latinos, and African-Americans received disease-modifying therapies.

In terms of functioning and disability levels, Latinos with MS fared better than other ethnic groups, the study reported. More Latinos reported normal function for mobility, bladder and bowel function, and vision, compared to whites and African-Americans.

Buchanan said that because the study results rely on the responses of voluntary participants, not a random data sample, the applicability of the findings to the larger MS population might be limited.



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