About Multiple Sclerosis Foundation



Home > Learn About Multiple Sclerosis > News > New Technology Provides Insight into Depression and MS

New Technology Provides Insight into Depression and MS

2/18/2014

More evidence has emerged to support previous research suggesting that changes in the hippocampus may contribute to the high frequency of depression in some people with multiple sclerosis.

A multicenter research team led by Cedars-Sinai neurologist Nancy Sicotte, M.D., an expert in MS and state-of-the-art imaging techniques, used a new, automated technique to identify shrinkage of a mood-regulating brain structure in a large sample of women with MS who also have a certain type of depression.

In the study, women with MS and symptoms of "depressive affect" -- such as depressed mood and loss of interest -- were found to have reduced size of the right hippocampus. The left hippocampus remained unchanged, and other types of depression -- such as vegetative depression, which can bring about extreme fatigue -- did not correlate with hippocampal size reduction, according to an article featured on the cover of the January 2014 issue of Human Brain Mapping.

The research shows that a computerized imaging technique called automated surface mesh modeling can readily detect thickness changes in subregions of the hippocampus. This previously required a labor-intensive manual analysis of MRI images.

Sicotte, the article's senior author, and others have previously found evidence of tissue loss in the hippocampus, but the changes could only be documented in manual tracings of a series of special high-resolution MRI images. The new approach can use more easily obtainable MRI scans and it automates the brain mapping process.

"Patients with medical disorders -- and especially those with inflammatory diseases such as MS -- often suffer from depression, which can cause fatigue. But not all fatigue is caused by depression. We believe that while fatigue and depression often co-occur in patients with MS, they may be brought about by different biological mechanisms. Our studies are designed to help us better understand how MS-related depression differs from other types, improve diagnostic imaging systems to make them more widely available and efficient, and create better, more individualized treatments for our patients," said Sicotte, director of Cedars-Sinai's Multiple Sclerosis Program and the Neurology Residency Program.

 



  Support the MSF
Supporting MSF's programs to help make "a brighter tomorrow" has never been easier.
make a donation 

  Learn About MS
Common symptoms of MS include fatigue, weakness, spasticity, balance problems, bladder and bowel problems, numbness, vision loss, tremors and depression.
learn more 

 

Unless otherwise specified, all medical content is compiled by MSF staff and reviewed for accuracy by a member of our Medical Advisory Board.

The MSF strives to present clear and unbiased information. This site is partially funded through a grant from Bayer Healthcare, LLC.

Website Design by SimplexWeb

© Copyright 2000-2013 Multiple Sclerosis Foundation - All Rights Reserved