About Multiple Sclerosis Foundation



Home > Learn About Multiple Sclerosis > News > FDA Approves Botox to Treat Urinary Incontinence with MS

FDA Approves Botox to Treat Urinary Incontinence with MS

8/26/2011

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) injection to treat urinary incontinence in people with neurologic conditions such as spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis who have overactivity of the bladder.

Uninhibited urinary bladder contractions in people with some neurological conditions can lead to an inability to store urine. Current management of this condition includes medications to relax the bladder and use of a catheter to regularly empty the bladder. The approved treatment consists of Botox being injected into the bladder resulting in relaxation of the bladder, an increase in its storage capacity, and a decrease in urinary incontinence.

"Urinary incontinence associated with neurologic conditions can be difficult to manage,” said George Benson, deputy director, Division of Reproductive and Urologic Products. “Botox offers another treatment option for these patients."

Injection of the bladder with Botox is performed using cystoscopy, a procedure that allows a doctor to visualize the interior of the bladder. Cystoscopy may require general anesthesia. The duration of the effect of Botox on urinary incontinence in people with bladder overactivity associated with a neurologic condition is up to 10 months.

The effectiveness of Botox to treat this type of incontinence was demonstrated in two clinical studies involving 691 patients. The participants had urinary incontinence resulting from spinal cord injury or MS. Both studies showed statistically significant decreases in the weekly frequency of incontinence episodes in the Botox group compared with placebo.

In addition to its use to improve the appearance of facial frown lines, Botox also is FDA-approved to treat chronic migraine headaches, certain kinds of muscle stiffness and contraction, severe underarm sweating, abnormal twitch of the eyelid, and a condition in which the eyes are not properly aligned.

The most common adverse reactions observed following injection of Botox into the bladder were urinary tract infection and urinary retention. Those who develop urinary retention after Botox treatment may require self-catheterization to empty the bladder.

Botox is marketed in the United States by Allergan Inc., of Irvine, Calif.



  Support the MSF
Supporting MSF's programs to help make "a brighter tomorrow" has never been easier.
make a donation 

  Learn About MS
Common symptoms of MS include fatigue, weakness, spasticity, balance problems, bladder and bowel problems, numbness, vision loss, tremors and depression.
learn more 

 

Unless otherwise specified, all medical content is compiled by MSF staff and reviewed for accuracy by a member of our Medical Advisory Board.

The MSF strives to present clear and unbiased information. This site is partially funded through a grant from Bayer Healthcare, LLC.

Website Design by SimplexWeb

© Copyright 2000-2013 Multiple Sclerosis Foundation - All Rights Reserved